May 2019 and June 2019 Boston Area Poetry Readings

Poetry and all that jazz

All that energy from National Poetry Month seems to have spilled into May and June this year. Of special note:

  • U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith reading at Harvard TODAY, May 2
  • Rafael Campo in Cambridge Monday, May 6
  • Gabrielle Calvocoressi in Belmont Thursday, May 23
  • New Boston Poet Laureate Porsha Olayiwola in Roslindale Thursday, May 23
  • Cervena Barva’s monthly readings at the Somerville Arts at the Amory

Thanks as always to Daniel Bouchard for compiling these listings.

Thursday, May 2, 4 – 5:30 pm
Tracy K. Smith
Harvard Arts Medal Ceremony
Agassiz Theatre
5 James St.
Cambridge, MA
free ticket required
617-496-2222

Thursday, May 2, 5:30 pm
Dawn Lundy Martin
Brown University
McCormack Family Theater
70 Brown St.
Providence, RI

Continue reading “May 2019 and June 2019 Boston Area Poetry Readings”

Come See Me Read at the Solidarity Salon, Saturday April 27, 2019

Flyer for Solidarity Salon, April 27, 7pm at Third Life Studios in Somerville MA

Thanks to Lisa DeSiro for organizing this event.

Solidarity Salon
Saturday, April 27, 2019
7:00–9:00pm (doors open 6:45pm)
Third Life Studio
33 Union Square, Somerville MA

Featuring:
Paintings by Andrea Lynne
Poetry by Robert Carr, Frances Donovan, and Kelly DuMar (with members of Playback Theatre)
Music by Robin Ginenthal (soprano) and Lisa DeSiro (piano)
Hard Stones, a song cycle written by Griffin Candey with texts by Lisa DeSiro,
performed by Ann Moss (soprano) and Lois Shapiro (piano)

Admission $5.00
Reception afterward including refreshments
Books, CDs, and art available to purchase

Directions and parking information: https://www.thirdlifestudio.com/directions

April 2019 Boston Area Poetry Readings

National Poetry Month means an explosion of poetry readings in Boston and environs. The Mass Poetry Festival is on hiatus this year as they work with Grub Street and the Harvard Bookstore to open the new Narrative Arts Center in South Boston’s Seaport District. The Boston Public Library is holding its own festival April 3-7 though–details below.

Thanks as always to Daniel Bouchard for compiling these listings. Check out his new book Spider Drop from Subpress Collective.

Of special note:

Continue reading “April 2019 Boston Area Poetry Readings”

How My Queerness Has Affected My Financial Well-Being

Dollar bill and queer pride flag

Nancy, one of my favorite podcasts, is doing a series on Queer Money Matters, and it’s gotten me thinking about how my queerness has affected my own financial well-being. Like my queerness itself, it’s all tangled up with other issues. Continue reading “How My Queerness Has Affected My Financial Well-Being”

March and April 2019 Boston Area Poetry Readings

Poetry and all that jazz

Expect lots more listings to arrive before National Poetry Month begins in April. March’s reading listings are rather rich as it is. Thanks as always to Daniel Bouchard for compiling these listings. Feel free to comment with your own announcements below, or submit your event for listing on the Mass Poetry website.

CLICK HERE FOR AN UPDATED LIST OF APRIL 2019 READINGS

Friday, March 1, 7 pm
Paula Bonnell, David Miller, Steve Rapp
The Old Manse
Concord, MA

Sunday, March 3, 1 – 3:30 pm
Tony Brown and Dzvinia Orlowsky
Poetry: The Art Of Words
Plymouth Public Library/Otto Fehlow Room
132 South St
Plymouth, MA

Monday, March 4, 8 pm
Mark Halliday and Adrian Blevins
Blacksmith House Poetry Series
56 Brattle St.
Cambridge, MA
$3

Continue reading “March and April 2019 Boston Area Poetry Readings”

Song and Compression in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry

Photograph of poet Emily Dickinson

Last semester I wrote a craft annotation on the subject of poetic structure and nonlinear time. Now I can see that this is very much an element of lyric poetry. Where narrative poetry moves like a road, lyric poetry unfolds like a flower, spiraling out from a single image or moment into a flurry of associations and other moments.

In The Flexible Lyric, Ellen Bryant Voigt calls out compression and song as two characteristics of lyric poetry. Emily Dickinson’s poems feature both of these qualities prominently. Her poems have a basic pattern: quatrains with alternating iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter lines. But the thing that set her apart from the dominant aesthetic of her time was the way she broke from the pattern. What her contemporaries might have called spasmodic, imperfectly rhymed, and lacking in form, we today consider a masterful interplay of meaning and music. Some of her poems adhered more closely to convention than others. Consider “Because I could not stop for Death” (poem 712):
Continue reading “Song and Compression in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry”

A Close Reading of “Elegy for My Father,” by Annie Finch

Detail of the cover of Spells: New and Selected Poems, by Annie Finch

Annie Finch titled her 2013 volume of selected poems Spells for good reason. A Wiccan as well as a poet, she recognizes the power of incantation in creating an altered consciousness, a state in which a strongly held vision can move from the realm of possibility into reality. Not all of Finch’s poems are visionary or transformative in intention, but they do share a powerfully persuasive incantatory quality.

Finch relies on a number of poetic techniques to create these incantations, most notably repetition of words and phrases and the use of iambs—the thump-THUMP of a heartbeat that calls up instinctive memories of the womb. But her repertory far exceeds the basic iamb, as we see in “Elegy for My Father.” While the poem definitely meets the criteria of an elegy – it recounts the vigil at her father’s deathbed – its complex dactylic meter runs counterpoint to the somber subject matter. Lines alternate between pure dactylic tetrameter and dactylic trimeter with a final, stressed syllable at the end, as in this example:

Continue reading “A Close Reading of “Elegy for My Father,” by Annie Finch”

Boston-Area Readings for February and March 2019

Image of candle lanterns with the caption "Poetry like a candle in the darkness" Photo credit: Jill111 via Pixabay. https://pixabay.com/en/lights-christmas-luminaries-night-1088141/

February 1, also known as Candlemas, marks the halfway point between the Winter Solstice and the Spring Equinox. Attend a reading to light your way from winter to National Poetry Month in April. Thanks as always to Daniel Bouchard for compiling these listings.

Of special note: Regie Gibson Feb. 13 at the newly opened Bedlam Books in Worcester; Morgan Parker (one of my poetry crushes) Feb. 12 at Brookline Booksmith; Martha Collins Feb. 27 at Suffolk University; Gloria Mindock Feb. 28 at Rozzi Reads; Layli Long Soldier March 5 at Smith College.

Friday, February 1, 7 pm
Linda Lamenza and Francis Lunney, Open Mic
Workshop for Publishing Poets
West Suburban YMCA
276 Church Street
Newton, MA

Friday, February 1, 7:30 pm
Kevin McLellan
Unearthed Song & Poetry
Home.stead Bakery and Cafe
1448 Dorchester Ave.
Fields Corner
Dorchester, MA

Sunday, February 3, 1 -3:30 pm
Lisa Sullivan and Iain Haley Pollack
Poetry: The Art Of Words
Plymouth Public Library/Otto Fehlow Room
132 South St
Plymouth, MA

February 3, 2 – 4 pm
Zvi A. Sesling
followed by open mic
Temple Sinai
50 Sewall Ave.
Brookline, MA

Continue reading “Boston-Area Readings for February and March 2019”

Come See Me Read in Roslindale on January 24, 2019, at 7pm

Photograph of Roslindale poets Phyllis Bluhm, Frances Donovan, and Mary Lou Maloney

I’m reading next Thursday in Roslindale (a neighborhood of Boston). There’s parking nearby, it’s on the commuter rail, and it’s a ten-minute bus ride from the Forest Hills T stop. Hope you can come.

Rozzie Reads Poetry
Featuring Roslindale Women Poets and Open Mic
Phyllis Bluhm, Frances Donovan, and Mary Lou Maloney

Thursday January 24, 2019 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Roslindale House, Community Room, 120 Poplar Street, Roslindale, MA

Sponsored by Friends of the Roslindale Branch Library, a free event, contributions voluntary, refreshments provided. Parking on Hawthorne and Poplar streets, in unnumbered spaces, and at rear of building.

Phyllis Bluhm is primarily a painter who works in acrylics, oils, encaustics and also 3 dimensional assemblages. As a physician assistant she worked at Lemuel Shattuck Hospital and continues to work in Urgent Care at Harvard Vanguard. She started writing poetry over 40 years ago when getting her masters degree in Art Therapy in Louisville, Kentucky, where she honed her dancing skills and became a founding member of the Louisville Ethnic Dancers which continues to this day.

Frances Donovan is the author of the chapbook Mad Quick Hand of the Seashore. Publication credits include The Rumpus, Snapdragon, Marathon Literary Review, and The Writer. She is a certified poet educator with Mass Poetry and reads for Sugar House Review. She once drove a bulldozer in a GLBTQ+ Pride parade while wearing a bustier. You can find her climbing hills in Roslindale and online at www.gardenofwords.com.

Mary Lou Maloney is a poet and former lobbyist for The Arc of Massachusetts, an organization that represents people who are developmentally delayed. She has studied poetry under Barbara Helfgott Hyett and is a member of Poemworks: The Workshop for Publishing Poets. She received her undergraduate degree at Regis College and her Masters at Boston College. Her work has appeared in Constellations, Lit Break, Third Wednesday, and Front Porch. She currently resides in Roslindale.

2018: The Year in Review

Image of spiral clock credit: Chris Limb via Flickr, Creative Commons License 2.0.

Rather than resolutions, I prefer to set intentions. Time to take stock of my 2018 intentions and see how they played out.

I put this post-it note on my wall at the beginning of this year:

Intentions for 2018:
– Enjoy my third semester
– Enjoy my semester off
– Move downstairs
– Stay out of the hospital
– Get my PMP
– Take a week off to relax
– Stay sober

Overall I was able to fulfill these goals, if not always in the way that I desired. Continue reading “2018: The Year in Review”