Boston Area Poetry Readings for October 2016

Take a break from apple-picking, pumpkin-carving, and costume-making. Join your fellow Yankees in a warm room on a cool night and listen to some poetry. Venues range from Gloucester to Providence, Boston to Northampton. Thanks as always to fellow poet Daniel Bouchard for compiling these listings.

Saturday, October 1, 7:30 pm
Kate Tarlow Morgan
Gloucester Writers Center
126 East Main Street
Gloucester, MA

Continue reading Boston Area Poetry Readings for October 2016

Back to School: Boston Area Poetry Readings for September and October, 2016

In August, I lean and loaf at my ease, observing a spear of summer grass. In September we stop at the dry cleaners and the grocery store / and the gas station and the green market and

then we make time for poetry.

The listings below will bring you right through to Halloween. As always, thanks to my informant Daniel Bouchard for compiling this list.

Sunday, September 11, 2 pm
Plein Air Poetry Walk
Ellie Coolidge-Behrstock, Zachary Bos, Lucinda Bowen, Polly Brown, Helen Marie Casey, David Davis , Linda Fialkoff, Lynn Horsky, Terry House, William Lenderking, Moira Linehan, Franny Osman, Dawn Paul, Mary Pinard, Joanne DeSimone Reynolds, Susan Edwards Richmond, Hilary Sallick, Georgia Sassen, bg Thurston
Old Frog Pond Farm & Studio
Harvard, MA Continue reading Back to School: Boston Area Poetry Readings for September and October, 2016

Dispatches From an MFA Program: The First Packet

Creating my very first packet for the Lesley low-residency MFA program was both easier and more difficult than I thought it would be. It’s difficult to get over that voice of self-doubt in the back of my head, the one that says both “your work must be perfect” and “your work will never be perfect.” In one of her seminars, Erin Belieu observed that the voice of self-doubt is just as much ego as the voice of complacency and overconfidence. And it’s impossible to get into the flow state so necessary for writing when the ego is up.

Listening to the program’s professors reflect on their own practices as writers was a tremendous help to me. In a getting-to-know-you session with our mentors, I asked “what was the most difficult poem you wrote?” Their thoughtful answers led to some wonderfully deep discussions about the very reasons for writing. My mentor Sharon Bryan made a comment about a poem’s emotional truth that resonated with me. Even though poetry is a powerful tool that uses words in semi-rational ways to appeal to that emotional mind, it’s not something I’d ever heard talked about in previous workshops.

I came to Lesley with a certain amount of emotional baggage.  Continue reading Dispatches From an MFA Program: The First Packet

Interview with Poet Carla Drysdale, Author of Little Venus and Inheritance

Carla Drysdale’s work explores difficult subjects such as childhood abuse and sexual exploitation with tight, lyrical nuance. Little Venus, Drysdale’s first book of poetry, came out in 2009 from Canadian publisher Tightrope Books. As often happens when poets create a persona, Drysdale’s Little Venus tells truths and makes assertions far bolder than another speaker might be able to.

Poet Carla Drysdale, author of Little Venus and Inheritance
Poet Carla Drysdale, author of Little Venus and Inheritance

Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including Paris Press, Cleaver Magazine, and PRISM. Her poem, “New Year’s Eve” was set to music by American Pulitzer-prize winning composer David Del Tredici. Her many accolades include writing residencies at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and La Porte Peinte in Noyers-Sur-Serein, France, as well as PRISM International’s Earle Birney poetry prize for her poem “Inheritance.” Finishing Line Press released her chapbook of the same name in early 2016.

A statuesque woman with a mass of curly auburn hair, she took some time out from her busy schedule as a communications consultant and mother of two to speak with me about her poetry.

What first brought you to poetry?

Poetry first came to me, I suspect, in my pre-verbal state, in lullabies sung by my mother, grandmother, and babysitters, as well as radio jingles and birdsong. My maternal grandmother was fond of reciting everything from Shakespeare to her own variation on Fuzzy-Wuzzy –- I learned from her how to play with language as a toddler. The King James version of the Holy Bible was tremendously important to me as a pre-teen and younger teen. The first time poetry actually stabbed me Continue reading Interview with Poet Carla Drysdale, Author of Little Venus and Inheritance