Love, Logic, Fear, and Investment

“Do you love me?” I asked him. In the dark. Fearful.

“Yes, I love you,” he said, surprised. “Why would you think I didn’t love you?”

I rose up and kissed him. “I just like to hear it,” I said.

If you spend your whole life dealing with mysterious man-disappearances, with a sudden slippage when you least expect it, perhaps it’s logical to expect it to keep happening.

In finance, past performance is no guarantee of future results.

In psychology, past behavior is the most reliable indicator of future response.

Of course, I’ve never invested in Army Guy before. Nor was he one of those other men who mysteriously disappeared.

2 Replies to “Love, Logic, Fear, and Investment”

  1. In psychology, past behavior is the most reliable indicator of future response.
    Of course, I’ve never invested in Army Guy before. Nor was he one of those other men who mysteriously disappeared.

    This is a vital distinction — a person’s past behavior is the best predictor of that person’s future behavior. But using other people’s past behavior to predict behavior of a new person from the same social group assumes that all members of that group behave the same way (e.g., stereotyping), which ignores the variation within any group (remember the bell curve!). But we are so prone to overgeneralize from our past experiences, aren’t we?

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